Tales From A Lazy Fat DBA

Den of an Oracle DB Performance freak & a fan of Cassandra, MySQL and PostgreSQL …

  • Likes

    • 138,422
  • Archives

  • ΰ₯

  • Categories

  • Subscribe

  • Advertisements
  • Prashant Dixit is the FatDBA

  • Follow Tales From A Lazy Fat DBA on WordPress.com
  • My Twitter Feeds

  • Disclaimer!

    FatDBA or Oracle ‘Ant’ is an independent web-blog/site.The experiences, Test cases, views, and opinions expressed in this website are my own and does not reflect the views or opinions of my employer.

    This site is independent of and does not represent Oracle Corporation in any way. Oracle does not officially sponsor, approve, or endorse this site or its content.
    Product and company names mentioned in this website may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

AMM (Automatic Memory Management) & ASMM (Automatic Shared MM)

Posted by FatDBA on December 31, 2012

Evolution of Memory Management Features:

Memory management has evolved with each database release:

Oracle Database 10g
Automatic Shared Memory Management (ASMM) was introduced in 10g. You enable the automatic shared memory management feature by setting the SGA_TARGET parameter to a non-zero value.

Oracle Database 11g
Automatic Memory Management is being introduced in 11g. This enables automatic tuning of PGA and SGA with use of two new parameters named MEMORY_MAX_TARGET and MEMORY_TARGET.

Oracle Database 11g supports various memory management methods, which are chosen by initialization parameter
settings. Oracle recommends that you enable the automatic memory management method.
1. Automatic Memory Management – For Both the SGA and Instance PGA
2. Automatic Shared Memory Management – For the SGA
3. Manual Shared Memory Management – For the SGA
4. Automatic PGA Memory Management – For the Instance PGA
5. Manual PGA Memory Management – For the Instance PGA

Untitled

Automatic Memory Management – For Both the SGA and Instance PGA

Beginning with Oracle Database 11g, Oracle Database can manage the SGA memory and instance PGA memory completely automatically. You designate only the total memory size to be used by the instance, and Oracle Database dynamically exchanges memory between the SGA and the instance PGA as needed to meet processing demands.
This capability is referred to as automatic memory management. With this memory management method, the database also dynamically tunes the sizes of the individual SGA components and the sizes of the individual PGAs. To achieve this, two new parameters have been introduced named MEMORY_MAX_TARGET and MEMORY_TARGET. To do so (on most platforms), you set only a target memory size initialization parameter (MEMORY_TARGET) and optionally a maximum memory size initialization parameter (MEMORY_MAX_TARGET).

Switching to Automatic Memory Management

1)Check the current values configured for SGA_TARGET and PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET.

SQL>SHOW PARAMETER TARGET

NAME TYPE VALUE
—————————— ———– —————-
archive_lag_target integer 0
db_flashback_retention_target integer 1440
fast_start_io_target integer 0
fast_start_mttr_target integer 0
memory_max_target big integer 0
memory_target big integer 0
pga_aggregate_target big integer 200M
sga_target big integer 500M

Add the values of pga_aggregate_target and sga_target. In our case it would sum to 700 M

2)Decide on a maximum amount of memory that you would want to allocate to the database which will determine the maximum value for the sum of the SGA and instance PGA sizes. In our case we decide to set to 808M

3)Change the parameter in initialization parameter file.

Using Spfile
==============
SQL>ALTER SYSTEM SET MEMORY_MAX_TARGET = 808M SCOPE = SPFILE;
SQL>ALTER SYSTEM SET MEMORY_TARGET = 808M SCOPE = SPFILE;
SQL>ALTER SYSTEM SET SGA_TARGET =0 SCOPE = SPFILE;
SQL>ALTER SYSTEM SET PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET = 0 SCOPE = SPFILE;

Using Pfile
==============
If you have started the instance with Pfile, then edit the pfile and set the parameters manually
MEMORY_MAX_TARGET = 808M
MEMORY_TARGET = 808M
SGA_TARGET =0
PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET = 0

In case you do not specify any value for MEMORY_MAX_TARGET and only use MEMORY_TARGET then database automatically sets MEMORY_MAX_TARGET to the value of MEMORY_TARGET. If you omit the line for MEMORY_TARGET and include a value for MEMORY_MAX_TARGET, the MEMORY_TARGET parameter defaults to zero. After startup, you can then dynamically change MEMORY_TARGET to a non-zero value, provided that it does not exceed the value of
MEMORY_MAX_TARGET.
MEMORY_MAX_TARGET is a static parameter i.e it cannot be changed Dynamically and Instance has to be bounced for modifying the value. So ensure that you have set it to appropriate value.

4)Shutdown and startup the database
SQL> shutdown immediate;
Database closed.
Database dismounted.
ORACLE instance shut down.

SQL> startup mount
ORACLE instance started.
Total System Global Area 845348864 bytes
Fixed Size 1303188 bytes
Variable Size 469765484 bytes
Database Buffers 369098752 bytes
Redo Buffers 5181440 bytes

SQL> show parameter target

NAME TYPE VALUE
———————————— ———– ——————————
archive_lag_target integer 0
db_flashback_retention_target integer 1440
fast_start_io_target integer 0
fast_start_mttr_target integer 0
memory_max_target big integer 808M
memory_target big integer 808M
pga_aggregate_target big integer 0
sga_target big integer 0

Automatic Shared Memory Management – For the SGA
If you want to exercise more direct control over the size of the SGA, you can disable automatic memory management and enable automatic shared memory management.This feature was introduced in 10g with a parameter known as SGA_TARGET. When automatic SGA memory management is enabled, the sizes of the different SGA components are flexible and can adapt to the needs of current workload without requiring any additional configuration. Please refer to following document for setting SGA_TARGET

In case you have enabled Automatic Memory Management , then to switch to Automatic Shared Memory Management , please follow below procedure

SQL>Alter system set MEMORY_TARGET=0 scope=both;
SQL>Alter system set SGA_TARGET=500M scope=both;

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: